Podcast Support Series

Our Podcast Support Series is an essential resource for graduates who are implementing The Fundamental Practices™. This 12-session audio series answers frequently asked questions and provides specific steps for daily practice. The podcast series’ portability and pacing encourages listeners to master one step at a time as they progress through the implementation process.

Podcast Support Series

Our Podcast Support Series is an essential resource for graduates who are implementing The Fundamental Practices™. This 12-session audio series answers frequently asked questions and provides specific steps for daily practice. The podcast series’ portability and pacing encourages listeners to master one step at a time as they progress through the implementation process.

PODCAST #1

An Introduction to Coaching

Podcast #1, An Introduction to Coaching, explains how to use the Podcast Series to master the Fundamental Practices™. It defines the three most common forms of teaching and learning, with an emphasis on practice and coaching as the primary drivers of adult behavioral change.

  • How to Enhance Your 2-Day Program Experience 
  • An Introduction to the Three Forms of Learning: Education, Training and Coaching
  • Four Conditions Necessary for Effective Coaching Relationships
  • Steps to Mastering The Breakthrough Coach Fundamentals™
  • The Podcast Support Series: Recommendations for Use
  1. What has been your experience with each of the three teaching and learning styles     presented – education, training and coaching?  Historically, which style has been the most productive for you in terms of your ability to embody new knowledge?
  2. Which teaching and learning style do you think will give you the most “bang for your buck” going forward? Which one would you like to include more in your own professional development experiences, and in the professional development experiences you create for your staff? How could you make that happen?
  3. What has been your relationship with “practice”? Do you practice a discipline outside of work and if so, how do you practice it? Do you need to alter your relationship with practice? If yes, how so? 
PODCAST #2

Clean Your Office Again….Really

Transforming your office into an impeccable conference room is a necessary precursor to getting into classrooms two days a week and maintaining a sensible workload. This session benchmarks where you are in the process and outlines specific actions to take to complete this critical first step.

Review formal definition of an Intentionally Created Space

  • What it looks like 
  • What it makes possible

The executive’s office right now – three possible scenarios 

  • Pristine, Empty, Zen-Like
  • Technician in a Clean Office
  • Way More West to Go

Scenario 1: Pristine, Empty, Zen-Like

  • What it looks like
  • Adding the finishing touches
  • Requests to make

Scenario 2: Technician in a Clean Office

  • What it looks like
  • Problems to anticipate
  • How to complete the cleaning process 

Scenario 3: Way More West to Go

  • What it looks like
  • Rationale and justifications
  • Are you ready to move forward? Questions to ask yourself
  • Complete the cleaning process now
    • Planning
    • Partnership
    • Promises
  1. Given the cleaning I’ve done to date, which scenario best represents my office?
  2. What actions do I now need to take to get my office to the next level of impeccability?
  3. What requests could I make and of whom to get to the next level? 
  4. What might stop me from making these requests? How will I handle my own resistance? 
  5. What progress will I make on my office and by when? 
PODCAST #3

How to Conduct a Productive Daily Secretary Meeting

This session teaches school secretaries how to successfully increase their capacity to run the front office, while also supporting their executives to become focused, results-oriented, instructional leaders.

Review Daily Secretary Meeting

  • Importance and purpose
  • Secretary’s role 

Best time of day to conduct meeting and suggested duration

Secretary’s meeting responsibilities 

Administrator’s meeting responsibilities

Items needed to conduct meeting

Standard Meeting Agenda

  • Signatures
  • Documents for review
  • Requests, promises and the running log
  • Items for follow-up
  • Daily calendar review
    • Three critical questions to discuss
    • Staying nine weeks out
  1. If your daily meeting is happening every day as planned, what have you put in place as a team to insure this?
    • Time of day?
    • Amount of time budgeted?
    • Coverage on the front desk?
    • Secretary preparation?
    • Executive preparation?
    • Requests you have made of others or of each other?
  2. If you’re not meeting every day, what do you now see is missing that, if it were in     place, would insure the meeting happened every day? Any specific requests to make? Of whom? To do what? By when?
  3. If your daily meeting is not happening at all, what Breakthrough Coach principles are you violating? What will you do to resolve this?
PODCAST #4

Build Your Capacity to Make and Manage Requests

When an executive becomes competent at making and managing requests, technical work is completed as requested, on time, by the appropriate technicians. The executive is then freed up to focus on the training and development of the entire staff. This session provides context and explanation for how to do both.

Introduction and Review of Terms

  • A manager’s job
  • Requests defined
  • Possible responses to a request
  • Benchmark your skills

Requests: Your primary tool for running the organization

Written Requests

  • Why bother?
  • Appropriate tools 
  • Variations on a theme
  • Creative uses for request forms

Managing Fulfillment

  • The Accountability Log
  • Additional tools for adult learners
  • Holding adults accountable
  • Expanding your circle of support

Practices for Developing Mastery

  1. How are you introducing the Request and Promise Form to your staff? How are you explaining your intent in using it?
  2. How have staff members responded to your explanation? How are they reacting to the form? What do you sense they think about it?
  3. How have you reacted to their reactions? Do you feel encouraged or discouraged about making requests? Have your feelings influenced the number of requests you’re making per day? If yes, how so?
  4. How could you present your requests in such a way that your staff sees them as opportunities to contribute to the organization, rather than orders, commands, or delegation? 
  5. Develop your own way of speaking and writing requests so that your staff hears/reads them as opportunities to contribute their own unique talents to the development and success of the entire organization.
PODCAST #5

How to Roll Out TBC to Your School Community

Learn how to introduce the Fundamental Practices (TM) to your greater school community. This session presents specific do’s and don’ts for speaking to staff, and provides helpful hints and tips for regularly reinforcing the message.

School Communities Include

  • Staff
  • Students
  • Parents
  • Central Office

The Don’ts

  • Don’t assume everyone wants to play
  • No zealot mindset
  • Don’t debut TBC at an all staff meeting
  • Don’t explain how TBC will make your life better

The Do’s

  • Develop a TBC “elevator talk”
    • Restate shared commitments
    • Complete the past
    • Tell a compelling story about the future
    • Explain your new practices

Take Your Elevator Talk For A Test-Run

  • Introduce to small groups first
  • Notice what communicates and what falls flat
  • Adjust your message and practice again

Anticipate Breakdowns / Preempt Concerns

  • Just because you said it doesn’t mean they heard it
  • Include examples of how the system is making a difference
  • Publicize accomplishments
  • Acknowledge people for their support
  • Use community feedback to improve 
  • Not everyone is going to like this – get used to it!
  1. Identify a group of staff members to whom you will introduce The Breakthrough Coach.
  2. Identify three commitments this group shares. How does the group talk about what they     care about? What do they say?
  3. Design your elevator talk around these three shared commitments.
  4. Practice delivering your elevator talk to this group in the next 30 days.
PODCAST #6

Breakthrough Scheduling: The 4th Fundamental Practice

Secretaries learn, step-by-step, how to build their executive’s calendar to account for weekly Coaching and Office Days, and maintain a sensible workload.

Goals of Breakthrough Scheduling

  • 2 Coaching Days per week
  • Administrator’s calendar planned out 6-8 weeks
  • Secretary “runs the show”

Review of Terms

  • Coaching Day
  • Office Day
  • Rest Day
  • Scheduling for Infrastructure

10 Standard Infrastructure Items to Include

  • Arrival Procedure Time
  • Go Home Time
  • Lunch Time
  • Daily Secretary’s Meeting
  • Standard Weekly Meetings
  • Office Days and Coaching Days
  • Coaching Time on Coaching Days
  • Time for Office Work on Coaching Days and Office Days
  • Time for Office Work on Office Days
  • Personal Activity Time

How to Schedule Infrastructure on the Calendar

Points to Remember

  1. What do you suspect might happen to the total number of hours per week you spend working once you add Arrival Time and Go Home Time to your calendar?
  2. What value do you see in blocking out Office Time on Office Days, versus leaving the schedule empty during this time?
  3. What reoccurring tasks do you do every week, or do you want to insure you do every week, that you could add to your calendar as reoccurring appointments with yourself?
PODCAST #7

Integrity: The Key to Continuous Breakthroughs

This session introduces the distinction Integrity – its definition, the impact it has on TBC implementation, and how to continually practice the concept at work. When an Executive-Secretary team manages the front office with integrity, the team gains more power to produce breakthroughs in their time, results and satisfaction.

Integrity

  • Dictionary definition
  • TBC interpretation

Benefits of Managing with Integrity

  • Trust
  • Partnership
  • Efficiency

Integrity – A Set of Behaviors

  • Giving and keeping your word
  • Being on time
  • Complete communication
  • Handling breakdowns

The Integrity Checklist 

  • A way to practice
  • Instructions for use
  1. Since attending the 2-Day, what have you noticed about your ability to give and keep your word? Has your ability to give and keep your word improved? If yes, how so? To what do you attribute this improvement? 
  2. What impacts your ability to give and keep your word? What factors make it easier? What factors make it more difficult? 
  3. What requests could you make and of whom that would support you to give and keep your word?
  4. How could you use the Integrity Checklist to strengthen your “keep your word” muscle? 
PODCAST #8

Cut Your Email Down to Size in Under Two Weeks

The prolific use of email as a primary communication tool is out of control, abusive and interfering with your ability to get work done. This podcast presents a stepped-up plan for cutting your email inbox down to size in two week’s time or less.

The Case for Intervention

Rehabilitation Techniques

  • Settle into silence 
  • Let your auto-reply do the talking 
  • Trash the junk mail 
  • Keep your friends close and your acquaintances out
  • Train your secretary to handle your email 
    • Don’t dump!
    • Train slowly – 15 minutes a day

The Executive’s Email Accountability

  • Devote limited time each day
  • Tricks for speedy completion
    • Communicate in the subject line 
    • The rule of 5 bullets
    • Schedule time to deal with ongoing projects
    • FWD with instructions
    • CC your secretary on everything – it’s all training
    • Send less email
  1. What does your current auto-reply message communicate? Does it educate your readers about how to effectively communicate with you through your front office staff? How could you edit it to be a more instructive communication tool?
  2. List five people you need to have the “I appreciate all that you do for our school, but please stop emailing me,” conversation with. Have this conversation with of each of them by the end of the month. Note their reactions to your request. Did the conversations go better or worse than you anticipated? How can you support them to follow your new email protocol?
  3. When are you going to start training your secretary to handle your email? How have you integrated “email training time” into your day? What immediate results do you anticipate? By when do you expect her to be handling the bulk of your email?
PODCAST #9

How to Make Coaching Days Work for Everyone

Executing two Coaching Days every week can be challenging. Students happen, the district office calls, a sudden deadline pops up – all of which can derail your best intentions. This lecture presents Coaching Day rules for success including sufficient preparation, familiarity with The Fundamentals ™, and surrendering to the will of your secretary.

Review Coaching Day Definition

  • For Site Principals
  • For District Office Administrators

Familiarize Stakeholders with Your Coaching Day Strategy 

  • Supervisors
  • Teachers 
  • Parents
  • Points to make with each group
  • Strategies to reinforce the message

How Secretaries Make Coaching Days Happen

  • Schedule the days on the calendar
  • Master one, then add a second
  • Refine and upgrade the process
  • Techniques to support mastery

Dealing With Executive Non-Compliance

When You Succeed

  • Toot your own horn!
  • Communicate all you’re seeing, learning and impacting 
  • Make stakeholders aware of how it’s working
  1. Have you had the appropriate set-up conversations about Coaching Days with each of your organization’s stakeholders? Do they understand how your time is now scheduled and why? What worked about having these conversations upfront? Is there anything you may have left out that you now want to address? How could you do that? 
  2. What standard practices do you and your secretary have in place to insure you achieve full coaching days out? If you’re not getting full coaching days out, what do you now realize is missing from your Coaching Day routine? What additional practice do the two of you need?
PODCAST #10

How to Make Office Days Work for Everyone

This podcast describes the context, conditions and practices that result in highly productive Office Days. It provides examples of how to talk about the benefits of well-managed Office Time, and outlines the executive’s role in ensuring that Office Days unfold as planned.

Detriments of the “Open Door Policy”

  • Derails the calendar
  • Upsets balance of power
  • Executive spends nights and weekends completing office work

Common Justifications

  • “People will think I am…”
  • Imagining worst possible outcomes
  • But no concrete evidence

How to Prep Staff for Office Days

  • Accurately define the “Open Door Policy” 
  • Office Days are about valuing everyone’s time and energy
  • You will get more of me with a closed door, not less
  • Office Days are the infrastructure needed to fulfill Coaching Day promises

Explain Secretary’s Role on Office Days 

  • Secretary schedules and supports me to prepare and execute Office Days
  • How she will do this is…

Executive’s Responsibilities so that Office Days Proceed as Planned

  1. Have you taken time to distinguish for your staff the difference between Coaching Days and Office Days? What did you say? How did they respond?
  2. Given the conversation starters presented in Podcast 10, how could you tweak your descriptions of Coaching Days and Office Days so that your staff/supervisor/parents/colleagues would be more receptive to the idea?
  3. Who are your recurrent Office Day intruders? How do they get around the boundaries you’ve set? Are you aiding and abetting their bad behavior? If yes, how so? 
  4. How would your secretary answer question 3? What are the difficult conversations you now need to have about this and with whom? By when will you have them? 
  5. How do you need to alter your own behavior to make Office Days and Coaching Days work for everyone, including yourself?
PODCAST #11

Celebrate Your Progress and Plan for More

If you’ve been consistently practicing The Breakthrough Coach system, it’s time to benchmark your results. Our Time Tracking Chart™ is the tool to use to get a comprehensive picture of your health on the job, and your progress towards working less and producing more.

Collect Current Data For

  • Time in classrooms
  • Time spent working 
  • Examine the ratio between the two
  • What you measure, moves

8 Categories to Track

  • Classroom or Building Time 
  • Training and Development Time
  • District Office
  • Office Work
  • On-Site Meetings
  • Off-Site Meetings 
  • Crisis Management
  • Supervision

How to Use the TTC

  • Description of the tool
  • Process 
  • Plot the data – no judgments
  • Review and adjust
  • Behavior alters as you observe yourself

This is Not a Casual Exercise

  • What you measure matters
  1. In which categories did we achieve our time goals this week? 
  2. In which categories did we fall short? 
  3. Did our results surprise us in any way? 
  4. What patterns are we observing and/or what are we learning from the TTC?
  5. How will we use this knowledge to impact next week’s schedule design?
  6. What requests do we need to make going forward?
PODCAST #12

Networks to Navigate By

Powerful leaders understand that nobody ever produces breakthroughs by themselves. Breakthroughs manifest when leaders build strong networks of support, and then intentionally engage those networks by making and managing requests of them. This final podcast presents the “special sauce” of breakthrough leadership which, when taken to heart, can profoundly impact the trajectory of a school executive’s career.

How to Keep Going with TBC

  • Create TBC communities of practice 
  • Focus on training and developing 
  • Build strong, viable networks of support 
  • Make lots of requests

Distinguish Networks of Support

  • Network of Love
  • Network of Professional Support
  • Network of Discursive Support
  • Network of Tactical Support
    • Professionals require strong networks of tactical support
    • The strength of your networks determines your capacity to produce breakthrough results 

How to Build Powerful Networks of Tactical Support – Examples

Executives Get Paid To Make and Manage Requests 

  • Requests that result in coordinated, effective action
  • Requests that increase time in classrooms and decrease time at work

Administrators as “Educational Entrepreneurs”

  • Move TBC beyond the front office 
  • Increase the strength and size of your networks of support
  • Make requests 
  • Stay sane while “the boat” continues to move forward
  1. Who would you like to include in your TBC community of practice? How will you structure the group so you meet and share ideas regularly?
  2. How viable is your Network of Professional Support? Who are its primary members? How do you communicate with, and cultivate this network? Do you seek their support when contemplating your career? Do they know what you’re committed to and how to support you?
  3. How viable is your Network of Discursive Support? Do they pick up the phone when you call? How do you include their expertise when navigating the course you have charted for yourself? 
  4. How viable is your Network of Tactical Support? List your key players. How do you contribute to their success, and how do they contribute to yours?
PODCAST #1

An Introduction to Coaching

Podcast #1, An Introduction to Coaching, explains how to use the Podcast Series to master the Fundamental Practices™. It defines the three most common forms of teaching and learning, with an emphasis on practice and coaching as the primary drivers of adult behavioral change.

  • How to Enhance Your 2-Day Program Experience 
  • An Introduction to the Three Forms of Learning: Education, Training and Coaching
  • Four Conditions Necessary for Effective Coaching Relationships
  • Steps to Mastering The Breakthrough Coach Fundamentals™
  • The Podcast Support Series: Recommendations for Use
  1. What has been your experience with each of the three teaching and learning styles     presented – education, training and coaching?  Historically, which style has been the most productive for you in terms of your ability to embody new knowledge?
  2. Which teaching and learning style do you think will give you the most “bang for your buck” going forward? Which one would you like to include more in your own professional development experiences, and in the professional development experiences you create for your staff? How could you make that happen?
  3. What has been your relationship with “practice”? Do you practice a discipline outside of work and if so, how do you practice it? Do you need to alter your relationship with practice? If yes, how so? 
PODCAST #2

Clean Your Office Again….Really

Transforming your office into an impeccable conference room is a necessary precursor to getting into classrooms two days a week and maintaining a sensible workload. This session benchmarks where you are in the process and outlines specific actions to take to complete this critical first step.

Review formal definition of an Intentionally Created Space

  • What it looks like 
  • What it makes possible

The executive’s office right now – three possible scenarios 

  • Pristine, Empty, Zen-Like
  • Technician in a Clean Office
  • Way More West to Go

Scenario 1: Pristine, Empty, Zen-Like

  • What it looks like
  • Adding the finishing touches
  • Requests to make

Scenario 2: Technician in a Clean Office

  • What it looks like
  • Problems to anticipate
  • How to complete the cleaning process 

Scenario 3: Way More West to Go

  • What it looks like
  • Rationale and justifications
  • Are you ready to move forward? Questions to ask yourself
  • Complete the cleaning process now
    • Planning
    • Partnership
    • Promises
  1. Given the cleaning I’ve done to date, which scenario best represents my office?
  2. What actions do I now need to take to get my office to the next level of impeccability?
  3. What requests could I make and of whom to get to the next level? 
  4. What might stop me from making these requests? How will I handle my own resistance? 
  5. What progress will I make on my office and by when? 
PODCAST #3

How to Conduct a Productive Daily Secretary Meeting

This session teaches school secretaries how to successfully increase their capacity to run the front office, while also supporting their executives to become focused, results-oriented, instructional leaders.

Review Daily Secretary Meeting

  • Importance and purpose
  • Secretary’s role 

Best time of day to conduct meeting and suggested duration

Secretary’s meeting responsibilities 

Administrator’s meeting responsibilities

Items needed to conduct meeting

Standard Meeting Agenda

  • Signatures
  • Documents for review
  • Requests, promises and the running log
  • Items for follow-up
  • Daily calendar review
    • Three critical questions to discuss
    • Staying nine weeks out
  1. If your daily meeting is happening every day as planned, what have you put in place as a team to insure this?
    • Time of day?
    • Amount of time budgeted?
    • Coverage on the front desk?
    • Secretary preparation?
    • Executive preparation?
    • Requests you have made of others or of each other?
  2. If you’re not meeting every day, what do you now see is missing that, if it were in     place, would insure the meeting happened every day? Any specific requests to make? Of whom? To do what? By when?
  3. If your daily meeting is not happening at all, what Breakthrough Coach principles are you violating? What will you do to resolve this?
PODCAST #4

Build Your Capacity to Make and Manage Requests

When an executive becomes competent at making and managing requests, technical work is completed as requested, on time, by the appropriate technicians. The executive is then freed up to focus on the training and development of the entire staff. This session provides context and explanation for how to do both.

Introduction and Review of Terms

  • A manager’s job
  • Requests defined
  • Possible responses to a request
  • Benchmark your skills

Requests: Your primary tool for running the organization

Written Requests

  • Why bother?
  • Appropriate tools 
  • Variations on a theme
  • Creative uses for request forms

Managing Fulfillment

  • The Accountability Log
  • Additional tools for adult learners
  • Holding adults accountable
  • Expanding your circle of support

Practices for Developing Mastery

  1. How are you introducing the Request and Promise Form to your staff? How are you explaining your intent in using it?
  2. How have staff members responded to your explanation? How are they reacting to the form? What do you sense they think about it?
  3. How have you reacted to their reactions? Do you feel encouraged or discouraged about making requests? Have your feelings influenced the number of requests you’re making per day? If yes, how so?
  4. How could you present your requests in such a way that your staff sees them as opportunities to contribute to the organization, rather than orders, commands, or delegation? 
  5. Develop your own way of speaking and writing requests so that your staff hears/reads them as opportunities to contribute their own unique talents to the development and success of the entire organization.
PODCAST #5

How to Roll Out TBC to Your School Community

Learn how to introduce the Fundamental Practices (TM) to your greater school community. This session presents specific do’s and don’ts for speaking to staff, and provides helpful hints and tips for regularly reinforcing the message.

School Communities Include

  • Staff
  • Students
  • Parents
  • Central Office

The Don’ts

  • Don’t assume everyone wants to play
  • No zealot mindset
  • Don’t debut TBC at an all staff meeting
  • Don’t explain how TBC will make your life better

The Do’s

  • Develop a TBC “elevator talk”
    • Restate shared commitments
    • Complete the past
    • Tell a compelling story about the future
    • Explain your new practices

Take Your Elevator Talk For A Test-Run

  • Introduce to small groups first
  • Notice what communicates and what falls flat
  • Adjust your message and practice again

Anticipate Breakdowns / Preempt Concerns

  • Just because you said it doesn’t mean they heard it
  • Include examples of how the system is making a difference
  • Publicize accomplishments
  • Acknowledge people for their support
  • Use community feedback to improve 
  • Not everyone is going to like this – get used to it!
  1. Identify a group of staff members to whom you will introduce The Breakthrough Coach.
  2. Identify three commitments this group shares. How does the group talk about what they     care about? What do they say?
  3. Design your elevator talk around these three shared commitments.
  4. Practice delivering your elevator talk to this group in the next 30 days.
PODCAST #6

Breakthrough Scheduling: The 4th Fundamental Practice

Secretaries learn, step-by-step, how to build their executive’s calendar to account for weekly Coaching and Office Days, and maintain a sensible workload.

Goals of Breakthrough Scheduling

  • 2 Coaching Days per week
  • Administrator’s calendar planned out 6-8 weeks
  • Secretary “runs the show”

Review of Terms

  • Coaching Day
  • Office Day
  • Rest Day
  • Scheduling for Infrastructure

10 Standard Infrastructure Items to Include

  • Arrival Procedure Time
  • Go Home Time
  • Lunch Time
  • Daily Secretary’s Meeting
  • Standard Weekly Meetings
  • Office Days and Coaching Days
  • Coaching Time on Coaching Days
  • Time for Office Work on Coaching Days and Office Days
  • Time for Office Work on Office Days
  • Personal Activity Time

How to Schedule Infrastructure on the Calendar

Points to Remember

  1. What do you suspect might happen to the total number of hours per week you spend working once you add Arrival Time and Go Home Time to your calendar?
  2. What value do you see in blocking out Office Time on Office Days, versus leaving the schedule empty during this time?
  3. What reoccurring tasks do you do every week, or do you want to insure you do every week, that you could add to your calendar as reoccurring appointments with yourself?
PODCAST #7

Integrity: The Key to Continuous Breakthroughs

This session introduces the distinction Integrity – its definition, the impact it has on TBC implementation, and how to continually practice the concept at work. When an Executive-Secretary team manages the front office with integrity, the team gains more power to produce breakthroughs in their time, results and satisfaction.

Integrity

  • Dictionary definition
  • TBC interpretation

Benefits of Managing with Integrity

  • Trust
  • Partnership
  • Efficiency

Integrity – A Set of Behaviors

  • Giving and keeping your word
  • Being on time
  • Complete communication
  • Handling breakdowns

The Integrity Checklist 

  • A way to practice
  • Instructions for use
  1. Since attending the 2-Day, what have you noticed about your ability to give and keep your word? Has your ability to give and keep your word improved? If yes, how so? To what do you attribute this improvement? 
  2. What impacts your ability to give and keep your word? What factors make it easier? What factors make it more difficult? 
  3. What requests could you make and of whom that would support you to give and keep your word?
  4. How could you use the Integrity Checklist to strengthen your “keep your word” muscle? 
PODCAST #8

Cut Your Email Down to Size in Under Two Weeks

The prolific use of email as a primary communication tool is out of control, abusive and interfering with your ability to get work done. This podcast presents a stepped-up plan for cutting your email inbox down to size in two week’s time or less.

The Case for Intervention

Rehabilitation Techniques

  • Settle into silence 
  • Let your auto-reply do the talking 
  • Trash the junk mail 
  • Keep your friends close and your acquaintances out
  • Train your secretary to handle your email 
    • Don’t dump!
    • Train slowly – 15 minutes a day

The Executive’s Email Accountability

  • Devote limited time each day
  • Tricks for speedy completion
    • Communicate in the subject line 
    • The rule of 5 bullets
    • Schedule time to deal with ongoing projects
    • FWD with instructions
    • CC your secretary on everything – it’s all training
    • Send less email
  1. What does your current auto-reply message communicate? Does it educate your readers about how to effectively communicate with you through your front office staff? How could you edit it to be a more instructive communication tool?
  2. List five people you need to have the “I appreciate all that you do for our school, but please stop emailing me,” conversation with. Have this conversation with of each of them by the end of the month. Note their reactions to your request. Did the conversations go better or worse than you anticipated? How can you support them to follow your new email protocol?
  3. When are you going to start training your secretary to handle your email? How have you integrated “email training time” into your day? What immediate results do you anticipate? By when do you expect her to be handling the bulk of your email?
PODCAST #9

How to Make Coaching Days Work for Everyone

Executing two Coaching Days every week can be challenging. Students happen, the district office calls, a sudden deadline pops up – all of which can derail your best intentions. This lecture presents Coaching Day rules for success including sufficient preparation, familiarity with The Fundamentals ™, and surrendering to the will of your secretary.

Review Coaching Day Definition

  • For Site Principals
  • For District Office Administrators

Familiarize Stakeholders with Your Coaching Day Strategy 

  • Supervisors
  • Teachers 
  • Parents
  • Points to make with each group
  • Strategies to reinforce the message

How Secretaries Make Coaching Days Happen

  • Schedule the days on the calendar
  • Master one, then add a second
  • Refine and upgrade the process
  • Techniques to support mastery

Dealing With Executive Non-Compliance

When You Succeed

  • Toot your own horn!
  • Communicate all you’re seeing, learning and impacting 
  • Make stakeholders aware of how it’s working
  1. Have you had the appropriate set-up conversations about Coaching Days with each of your organization’s stakeholders? Do they understand how your time is now scheduled and why? What worked about having these conversations upfront? Is there anything you may have left out that you now want to address? How could you do that? 
  2. What standard practices do you and your secretary have in place to insure you achieve full coaching days out? If you’re not getting full coaching days out, what do you now realize is missing from your Coaching Day routine? What additional practice do the two of you need?
PODCAST #10

How to Make Office Days Work for Everyone

This podcast describes describes the context, conditions and practices that result in highly productive Office Days. It provides examples of how to talk about the benefits of well-managed Office Time, and outlines the executive’s role in ensuring that Office Days unfold as planned.

Detriments of the “Open Door Policy”

  • Derails the calendar
  • Upsets balance of power
  • Executive spends nights and weekends completing office work

Common Justifications

  • “People will think I am…”
  • Imagining worst possible outcomes
  • But no concrete evidence

How to Prep Staff for Office Days

  • Accurately define the “Open Door Policy” 
  • Office Days are about valuing everyone’s time and energy
  • You will get more of me with a closed door, not less
  • Office Days are the infrastructure needed to fulfill Coaching Day promises

Explain Secretary’s Role on Office Days 

  • Secretary schedules and supports me to prepare and execute Office Days
  • How she will do this is…

Executive’s Responsibilities so that Office Days Proceed as Planned

  1. Have you taken time to distinguish for your staff the difference between Coaching Days and Office Days? What did you say? How did they respond?
  2. Given the conversation starters presented in Podcast 10, how could you tweak your descriptions of Coaching Days and Office Days so that your staff/supervisor/parents/colleagues would be more receptive to the idea?
  3. Who are your recurrent Office Day intruders? How do they get around the boundaries you’ve set? Are you aiding and abetting their bad behavior? If yes, how so? 
  4. How would your secretary answer question 3? What are the difficult conversations you now need to have about this and with whom? By when will you have them? 
  5. How do you need to alter your own behavior to make Office Days and Coaching Days work for everyone, including yourself?
PODCAST #11

Celebrate Your Progress and Plan for More

If you’ve been consistently practicing The Breakthrough Coach system, it’s time to benchmark your results. Our Time Tracking Chart™ is the tool to use to get a comprehensive picture of your health on the job, and your progress towards working less and producing more.

Collect Current Data For

  • Time in classrooms
  • Time spent working 
  • Examine the ratio between the two
  • What you measure, moves

8 Categories to Track

  • Classroom or Building Time 
  • Training and Development Time
  • District Office
  • Office Work
  • On-Site Meetings
  • Off-Site Meetings 
  • Crisis Management
  • Supervision

How to Use the TTC

  • Description of the tool
  • Process 
  • Plot the data – no judgments
  • Review and adjust
  • Behavior alters as you observe yourself

This is Not a Casual Exercise

  • What you measure matters
  1. In which categories did we achieve our time goals this week? 
  2. In which categories did we fall short? 
  3. Did our results surprise us in any way? 
  4. What patterns are we observing and/or what are we learning from the TTC?
  5. How will we use this knowledge to impact next week’s schedule design?
  6. What requests do we need to make going forward?
PODCAST #12

Networks to Navigate By

Powerful leaders understand that nobody ever produces breakthroughs by themselves. Breakthroughs manifest when leaders build strong networks of support, and then intentionally engage those networks by making and managing requests of them. This final podcast presents the “special sauce” of breakthrough leadership which, when taken to heart, can profoundly impact the trajectory of a school executive’s career.

How to Keep Going with TBC

  • Create TBC communities of practice 
  • Focus on training and developing 
  • Build strong, viable networks of support 
  • Make lots of requests

Distinguish Networks of Support

  • Network of Love
  • Network of Professional Support
  • Network of Discursive Support
  • Network of Tactical Support
    • Professionals require strong networks of tactical support
    • The strength of your networks determines your capacity to produce breakthrough results 

How to Build Powerful Networks of Tactical Support – Examples

Executives Get Paid To Make and Manage Requests 

  • Requests that result in coordinated, effective action
  • Requests that increase time in classrooms and decrease time at work

Administrators as “Educational Entrepreneurs”

  • Move TBC beyond the front office 
  • Increase the strength and size of your networks of support
  • Make requests 
  • Stay sane while “the boat” continues to move forward
  1. Who would you like to include in your TBC community of practice? How will you structure the group so you meet and share ideas regularly?
  2. How viable is your Network of Professional Support? Who are its primary members? How do you communicate with, and cultivate this network? Do you seek their support when contemplating your career? Do they know what you’re committed to and how to support you?
  3. How viable is your Network of Discursive Support? Do they pick up the phone when you call? How do you include their expertise when navigating the course you have charted for yourself? 
  4. How viable is your Network of Tactical Support? List your key players. How do you contribute to their success, and how do they contribute to yours?

The Breakthrough Coach – An Introductory Session

Recorded live in 2011, The Breakthrough Coach Vice President, Jill Pancoast, introduces school leaders to a management methodology designed to dramatically reduce their total working hours, and significantly increase their time spent in classrooms being instructional leaders.

The Philosophical Underpinnings Of TBC’s Approach

What It is…What It isn’t…Why It Matters?

The Administrator’s Office Deconstructed For High Performance

7 Steps On The Road Less Traveled

Audience Questions and Conclusion

The Breakthrough Coach – An Introductory Session

Recorded live in 2011, The Breakthrough Coach Vice President, Jill Pancoast, introduces school leaders to a management methodology designed to dramatically reduce their total working hours, and significantly increase their time spent in classrooms being instructional leaders.

SESSION #1

Breakthrough Thinking

The Philosophical Underpinnings Of TBC’s Approach

SESSION #2

Management Redefined

What It is…What It isn’t…Why It Matters?

SESSION #3

Form Follows Function

The Administrator’s Office Deconstructed For High Performance

SESSION #4

How to Produce a Breakthrough in Your Time and Results

7 Steps On The Road Less Traveled

SESSION #5

Audience Questions

Audience Questions and Conclusion